LVT, the virtual world and a missed opportunity?


We regularly get told that land is no longer important in the world of the virtual economy, and that companies such as Apple and Google would get away with paying next to nothing.

Yet people are still living in real houses, consuming real food and real energy, wearing real clothes, driving real cars, travelling in real trains and aircraft, purchasing real electronic goods made in real factories using raw materials grown on the real surface of the planet or dug out of real holes in the ground. How does virtualisation change any of that?

There is another angle to this, too. I have been involved with land value tax campaign organisations for over forty years and am in contact with others, in particular in the USA. Apple has been around for most of that time; Google has been big for at least fifteen years.

The land value tax movement is not mainstream as it was in the years up to 1939, but it is not unknown, yet no organisation within the movement has ever been approached by these or any other technology companies. If it was to the advantage of Apple, Google, etc, they would have a vested interest in promoting what we are doing. Why, then, have they never come forward with offers of assistance?

It is also the case that there are some pretty smart people within the land value tax movement who would themselves have realised that, if LVT was so good for companies which operate in cyberspace, they would want to support our work; they would surely have tapped them for funds, which would certainly have been forthcoming. Have we all missed a trick?


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